Blog

Every year, as I think about the Thanksgiving holiday, I always try to concentrate on the things that we as a union, and our sisters and brothers in solidarity everywhere, have to be thankful for. And, as always, there is much to be thankful for. But what to say about 2020?
Local 163 President Ralph Morris Jr. talks about the importance of certifying November's election results and making sure that every vote is counted.
MAY WE NEVER WITNESS THIS AGAIN By Ray Curry, Secretary-Treasurer, UAW Over the past weeks across the nation, united demonstrations have made the message clear: People have had enough of the ongoing struggle for equality and equity, of the battle against systemic injustice, and the fear of being a person of color in America.
The Spring 2020 edition of Solidarity magazine is now online! The latest edition of Solidarity magazine salutes our own heroes who are fighting the COVID-19 pandemic in a variety of ways, from courageously going back to the plants to make PPE and ventilators to volunteering in the community and much more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has sent our world into a public health and economic tailspin. As of May, the national unemployment rate was at 13.3%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In Michigan, it is a staggering 21.2% — worse than the Great Recession. The Washington Post reports that more than 100,000 businesses have closed permanently.
On June 23, 1963, over 125,000 people marched down Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan in the 'Walk to Freedom.' The march was the largest civil rights demonstration at the time highlighting the injustices African Americans faced across the country.
For Gerald Kariem, Juneteenth feels even more special in Detroit. So many successful Black Americans today are descendants of the millions of men and women who left the south for work in the north starting back in 1916 to build Ford cars.
Today, we take time to honor the memory of our lost brother, George Floyd. We will sit still, we will put down our tools and silence our phones for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. A full eight minutes and 46 seconds -- the agonizing amount of time that Mr. Floyd lay on the pavement begging for his life.